Eyes

Eyes

munirajuDiabetic Eye Disease
Ramu Muniraju (Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon)
A lecture on diabetic eye disease by Ramu Muniraju Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon Paediatrician Ashford and St Peter's Hospitals.
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Zac KoshyRetinal Detachment
Zac Koshy (Consultant Ophthalmologist)

Mr Zachariah Koshy is a Consultant Ophthalmologist based at Ayrshire and Glasgow. He has 15 years of experience in ophthalmology with a special interest in surgical and medical retina having gained fellowships in both these fields. His practice incorporates recent advances in these areas providing the complete spectrum of the latest treatments for retinal pathology.

Mr Koshy has innovated in the technique of suture less vitrectomy and has published and widely presented on this theme as well as retinal diagnostic protocols. Suture less vitrectomy affords a significantly more comfortable and faster post operative recovery than conventional surgery. The vast majority of these cases are now done as local anaesthetic day case procedures.

Retinal detachment is a disorder of the eye in which the retina peels away from its underlying layer of support tissue. Initial detachment may be localized, but without rapid treatment the entire retina may detach, leading to vision loss and blindness. It is a medical emergency.
Retinal detachment is a rare condition. Only 1 in every 10,000 people will develop a new case of retinal detachment in any given year in the UK. As retinal detachment is associated with ageing, most cases affect older adults aged between 50 and 75.

Retinal detachment caused by an injury can affect people of any age, including children.

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Tom EkeIntroduction to Chronic Glaucoma
Tom Eke (Consultant Ophthalmologist)

Tom Eke Consultant Ophthalmologist, Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Cromer Hospital, Honorary Senior Lecturer in Ophthalmology, University of East Anglia. He is a cataract specialist and a glaucoma specialist and his other interests include neuro-ophthalmology, vision for driving and anaesthesia for ophthalmology. His research interests are mainly around anaesthesia safety, surgical techniques and improving the patient experience for which he regularly lectures on at numerous international conferences.

Chronic glaucoma is a common and potentially blinding condition which is usually asymptomatic until advanced. Approximately 10% of blindness registrations in the UK are attributed to glaucoma. It affects around 2% of those over 40 rising to almost 10% in people older than 75, and the prevalence increases in people of black African descent.
There are over a million glaucoma-related outpatient visits in the hospital eye service annually.

Tom's talk on chronic glaucoma is an update and overview for GPs. Patients are, on the whole, managed by opticians and ophthalmologists. However, it is GPs who are responsible for prescribing, and there are a lot of patients with glaucoma on every GP list. Lifetime risk of developing glaucoma is 2%.

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Tom EkeCataract for GP's
Tom Eke (Consultant Ophthalmologist)

Tom Eke Consultant Ophthalmologist, Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Cromer Hospital, Honorary Senior Lecturer in Ophthalmology, University of East Anglia. He is a cataract specialist and a glaucoma specialist and his other interests include neuro-ophthalmology, vision for driving and anaesthesia for ophthalmology. His research interests are mainly around anaesthesia safety, surgical techniques and improving the patient experience for which he regularly lectures on at numerous international conferences. He has developed a special technique for patients who are unable to lie flat for cataract surgery, performing a cataract operation with the patient sitting upright.

Cataract is the most common cause of blindness worldwide and is conventionally treated with surgery.
Those with cataract commonly experience difficulty appreciating colors and changes in contrast, driving, reading, recognizing faces, and experience problems coping with glare from bright lights.Tom performs about 600-700 eye operations or laser procedures a year, mainly for cataract and glaucoma

This lecture on cataract management is an overview of the subject for GPs, providing an understanding of what cataracts are, how they present and how they are dealt with by ophthalmologists.

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Tom EkeAcute Eye Problems
Tom Eke (Consultant Ophthalmologist)

Tom Eke Consultant Ophthalmologist, Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Cromer Hospital, Honorary Senior Lecturer in Ophthalmology, University of East Anglia.

His lecture recorded here is a very useful update on assessing and managing the acute eye, and is organised according to a simple algorithm, to make it easy to remember. After briefly reviewing the anatomy of the eye Tom discusses first the problem of "something in the eye-what to do?" He has some very practical advice for the common problems that arise, using a ophthalmoscope as a magnifier, everting the upper lid, irrigation and so on.

Tom deals with all of the other causes of acute eye problems, in all of the possible combinations: painful/painless, red/white, loss vision/no loss vision, acute/gradual, single/bilateral.

This is a lecture that you will return to regularly, to dip into for advice when the need occurs.

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